Different Slants

Seeing the World from a New Angle

What Are the Chances For Happiness?…by Robert M. Katzman

Filed under: Bewilderment,Depression and Hope,Life & Death,Marriage and Family,My Own Personal Hell,Uncategorized — Bob at 9:22 am on Sunday, November 3, 2019

Diana Leslie Gallai Weinstein Eulogy: Diana Leslie Weinstein, nee Gallai, 48, beloved mother of Zachary Weinstein; loving daughter of Adele Ballis, nee Warman, and the late Sieg Gallai; dear sister of Julie Gallai and Bruce Ballis.

(Note: I read the first half of this Eulogy to my cousin Diana, but was unable to read the rest. So Joyce, standing next to me, immediately continued to read the words. This happened often, and Joy was always there to fill the gap. My missing hero.)

What are the Chances for Happiness? © March 4, 2008

I think the odds are long.

It requires a person to make choices.

Should I love someone?

Should I take this job?

Should I risk traveling?

Should I have a child?

 And other choices.

 If you love someone, will they love you back?

(Read on …)

Writer Robert M. Katzman Interview with Marshall Smith

Filed under: Uncategorized — Bob at 1:20 pm on Thursday, August 29, 2019

https://youtu.be/ZP7w8kC8pAs?list=PLnve-etIpQn0uV8Neayz11ZGMy84Z0h6T

On Prejudice in America 2019…by Robert M. Katzman

On Prejudice, in America 2019
By Robert M. Katzman © July 21, 2019

Overall, my family, too, can be told go back to where we came from, except when you read where we came from, well, we’ll need a lot of planes flying in different places.

As far skin color, gee, well…, um, some white like doves, some as dark as the bark of an old oak, some ruddy red like a deep sunset, some olive colored, like me, I suppose, which frankly my very very “white” Norwegian/Danish wife thought was very attractive. Or she kissed that olive skin often enough over 42 years. I don’t think Joy ever saw color.

While she was alive, if someone made some stupid prejudiced remark about her grandchildren, or yours, that hidden Viking axe was never too far away from her to erupt into rage. If my Joyce were alive, she’d make a hellova president. Even dead, she’s way better than the sewer of hate we’re immersed in now.

Silence isn’t golden. That’s why all your brave and tough grandparents, came to America in he first place. Would they admire their grandchildren today?

My original post starts here:

(Read on …)

Learning To Work With Your Hands…by Robert M. Katzman

by Robert M. Katzman © May 20, 2019

Learning to work with your hands changes your worldview and increases your ability to take care of yourself and be more independent. It also helps make a person more compassionate to other people’s physical limitations, because so many are one injury away from unemployment.

To me, judging another’s worth by what they do for a living is a sin. But then, running a wooden newspaper stand as a teenager to allow me to pay for high school with privileged classmates will create feelings like that in a person. Seven of my 160 classmates ended up working for me, at one time, or another. 

(Read on …)

Someone is Always Deciding What America is “Ready” For…by Robert M. Katzman

by Robert M. Katzman ©March 21, 2019

A nice person I know, Jewish like me, posted a reflection that America may not be ready to elect a gay person to be president. 


The basic idea expressed was that South Bend, Indiana’s Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s time was not “now” no matter how qualified he may be. I am not neutral and admire him, so I wrote this:


(I know others may not agree with me, but speaking up is why people came here in the first place. You are legally entitled NOT to agree with me in America or anyone else, but in a civilized way)

This country wasn’t “ready” for the revolution in 1776, either, and a third of the colonists were against it. Many fled to Canada. I know that long before that date, the Native Americans weren’t ready for the English.

(Read on …)

Poetry About: “Work”…by The Kenosha Writer’s Guild

Filed under: Uncategorized — Bob at 4:24 am on Wednesday, March 13, 2019

An excellent short film of poetry about work, by writers who know what the word actually means: Illustrations by Darleen Coleman, poetry by Marshall Smith, Robert M. Katzman, Dave Gourdoux, and Joe Engel. 13 minutes about sweat, grunt, gears, steel-toed leather boots and men pretending to hope.

(Read on …)
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